“On the surface, Dilruba Ahmed’s poems are rich and variegated. They spin like compass needles crowded around by magnetic fields, and they’d probably seem as exotic to a citizen of Dhaka as they would to a citizen of Duluth. In their depths, though, they seem anything but exotic; they seem to be our own impossible, loving, intimate, bereaved thoughts restored to us transformed and ennobled.”
Vijay Seshadri, author of The Long Meadow

"[Ahmed] understands that she’s dust . . . She’s dust whipped across continents to land in, of all places, Ohio; dark-skinned dust to be spurned, shunned or boot-heeled; immigrant Muslim dust that is feared but also fears. Ms. Ahmed knows too that words are dust, but in them she found her 21st-century self, saved herself.”
The New York Times

“The language in Dilruba Ahmed’s admirable first collection scintillates. The notes it hits are delightfully unexpected. Weaving together innovative and traditional forms, Ahmed has chosen to illuminate experiences of Bangladesh and America that defy categorization, that illustrate the truth of being a woman in today’s world: global, hybrid, and ultimately alone.”
 Chitra Divakaruni,
author of Before We Visit the Goddess

"Dhaka Dust transports you into a world heart-wrenchingly infused with gorgeous metaphor and grace. It’s impossible to turn down a request for '…the taste of another’s prayer/ cool as a coin / newly minted on the tongue.' Dilruba Ahmed is a stunning talent, a 'heart-thief' with 'jasmine strands tangled at [her] neck.' This collection will burn brightly in your imagination for years to come. World, get ready for the loveliest of poetry debuts.”
Aimee Nezhukumatathil, author of Oceanic